The Gloaming…



Categories: BrewNSpew reblogs

9 replies

  1. Aren’t you underway to Missouri or some place to the NW?

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  2. I had to look up that word and that’s a good thing. I’ve learned so many new words here.

    Have a fabulous day. ♥

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  3. Guid old Scots wurrrd, tha’ !

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  4. I think of Scotland or northern England, when I hear the word gloaming. It also evokes the graveyard-shades of Macbeth’s opening scene.

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    • You are right on track, Per Merriam-Webster, “If “gloaming” makes you think of tartans and bagpipes, well lads and lasses, you’ve got a good ear and a good eye; we picked up “gloaming” from the Scottish dialects of English back in the Middle Ages. The roots of the word trace to the Old English word for twilight, “glōm,” which is akin to “glōwan,” an Old English verb meaning “to glow.” In the early 1800s, English speakers looked to Scotland again and borrowed the now-archaic verb gloam, meaning “to become twilight” or “to grow dark.”

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